DC

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Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Pete Peters and the $500 Score

The past two summers, I rolled into Vegas fully expecting to make some cash on the felt.  Instead, I left with my ass handed to me.  Aces cracked.  Sets of aces crack.  Virtually nothing went right.  This trip, I was determined to change my luck.  Unfortunately, it did not get off to a good start.  Rather, my first session of the vacation, playing just to the left of famed poker player (and legendary womanizer) Rob, I dug myself almost immediately into a $200 hole.  Nice.  I love a challenge.

Over the course of the next week, I played mainly tournaments, including the Binions' Classic and the Aria daily.  I cashed none.  Nice.

Thursday evening, with several days remaining on the trip, I returned to the cash table and left with a modest win.  But still in the red overall.

Finally, Saturday July 13th.  Last day of the trip.  Last chance to leave town on a positive note.

After one last trip to the Signature pool, and a stop by the MGM sports book to place a bet on Texas +165 versus undefeated Max Scherzer and the Detroit Tigers (which cashed easily), I arrived at the poker room at around 2:00.  After a ten minute wait, a new table opened, and I took the two seat with $200 in chips.    Tight was right, and I barely played a hand over the first several orbits.  Finally, I looked down at 99 on the cutoff.    Two people limped, including the young agro to my right.  I raised to $12.  Young agro commented that I rarely ever raise (true of the 20 or 30 minutes we had been playing . . .) and called.  The flop came out 457 with two diamonds.  Young agro donks out three redbirds.  I smell a draw and raise to $45.  Young agro tanks, and starts talking about the "nothing hand" he is currently holding . . . about "how weak" he is.  Then, of course, he shoves for $65 and finishes his diatribe with "you're going to hate me . . ."  More confirmation he is indeed on a draw.  Not that it mattered since I owed a mere $20 on top.  I call and flip my 99.  The board runs out and Young Agro mucks.  I rake a nice $80 pot with pocket 9's.

Shortly thereafter, I look down at QQ and raise 5 limpers to $17, giving a little less than 2-1 for a call.  The big blind calls, and the remaining players fold.  The flop runs out J K 7 with two clubs.  Big blind, an older, extremely tight gentlemen leads out for $30.  He's not betting a jack.  And I'm not convinced he's leading into this pot with a club draw.  That sort of leaves the K.  I fold.

A few hands later, I look down at Q 6 from the small blind and toss in a blue chip to complete.  The flop comes out QQ9.  Sort of nice.  I'm able to drag a $30 pot.

Then it was Game. SET. Match.  Hand number one -- I limp call $12 with 77 and go heads up against a very capable player.  The flop comes down 6 7 9 rainbow.  Not perfect.  But, given Villain's $12 preflop raise, I'm not too concerned that this particular flop hit him.  I'd be far more worried in a multi-player pot.  I check.  He checks back.  Turn is a K.  I check and villain bets $17.  I just call.  River is a T.  I decide to check again.  He bets $25.  I call, he shows a K, and I scoop a $60 pot.  Not sure if I could have gotten much more value out of the hand.  Given that he had the K, I probably could have value bet the river for somewhat more than $25 and still gotten a call.  Obviously, I could also have checked raised the river, although villain claimed afterwards he would have folded his top pair.   At the time, I choose not to because of the obvious straight on the board and the fear of being check-raised.  But, upon considering the hand afterwards, that fear seemed pretty unrealistic.  Not a lot of hands Villain could have that would put the eight beneath his fingers -- 88, perhaps.  That's about it unless he raised preflop with 79 or A8 suited (or, less likely, T8).  I probably should have at least tried a modest check raise in that spot.    

Three hands later I limp called $12 again with 55.  This time, we went four to the flop: 5 J K with two clubs.  I'm first to act and check (although still hoping to play this board fast).  Original raiser bets $25 and gets one call.  Action is back on me and I raise to $85.  No takers.  I'm content winning $85 given the texture of the board (I've learned my lesson "slow playing" my sets!!!).               

I left the table shortly thereafter, pocketing a decent $220 win. 

During my session, I had been texting with grrouchie, with whom I was planning on meeting with later that evening for some adult beverage and poker.  I decided to grab some food, a few beers, and then head down to Bally's for our blind bromance date.  It was my last day in town, and I decided to revisit the place where my trip first began -- Michael Mina's Pub 1842 at MGM.  This place is relatively new.  MGM's answer to the Todd English P.U.B. at Crystals.   Pub 1842 has a great selection of beers and really good food.  I had $230 in comps on my MLife card, and decided to burn a bunch.  First up - Miller lite and Oysters.  Next, Miller Lite and the grilled ahi tuna.  And finally, for desert - Miller Lite in a "go cup." 

I then began the walk down the strip from MGM to Bally's.  Even though it was 6:00 or so, it was still H.O.T.  I lacked the conditioning to make the journey without a few rests along the way.  I stopped first at El Diablo's for a cold Corona Light.  Feeling refreshed, I ventured on.  Suddenly, Bally's was in sight.  Was it a mirage?  Not The Mirage, but a mirage?  Possibly.  At the very least, the nearness was most likely some sort of illusion based on the size of the casino.  Could I make it all the way there without another break?  Possibly.  But why risk it.  I stopped at The PH and ventured into the Miracle Mile, suddenly finding myself at the Oyster & Wine Bar.  Some Shiraz might provide the strength needed to complete my journey . . .

Success!  I rolled into Bally's around 6:30 and quickly spotted a rather slender gentlemen with a love of comics, movies, weird music, the Pittsburgh Steelers, and, apparently, Mimosas.  After some small talk, a new table opened up and grrouchie and I sat down to play.  grrouchie took the one seat (purportedly to harass the dealer) and I took the two seat (with the intention of harassing grrouchie all night with incessant check raises . . .).

My evening got off to a fantastic start with a fantastic hand - K3 hearts.  After a few limpers, including grrouchie, I called.  A player then raised to $10.  I was going to fold.  I have to fold.  K3 suited is no hand to be played, particularly out of position.  But then grrouchie called.  And I'd feel like less of a man limp-folding the first hand played alongside this local Vegas legend and poker blogger extraordinaire.  So I call $10, and we see a K high rainbow flop.  Now what?  I call a flop bet.  After a heart on the turn, I call a turn bet.  And after a river blank, I call a modest bet on 5th street.  Of course, my King is outkicked and I'm immediately out  $85.  grrouchie offers a conciliatory "well, you picked up the second nut flush on the turn."  Well, there's that . . . I'm done trying to impress grrouchie . . . 

A short while later, I reloaded for another $100.

Then I went on a 10 minute heater of magnificent proportions:  AK, followed by AK, followed by AA.  I raised each hand to $12.  I got zero callers.  And in the end, after tipping the dealer, I lost a total of $2.

Finally, things changed, beginning with the hand detailed here.   I drag a nearly $300 pot.  Nice.

Shortly thereafter, I limp in against Pit Boss with A3 spades and flop a 3.  He leads out, I call.  He fires the turn, I raise.  He folds.  I now have nearly his entire stack and he is reloading.

A few minutes there after, I look down at KK in position.  An early position short stack shoves his last $65.  Pit boss can't resist.   He calls (fuck, why didn't he try to isolate!!!!!).  I eye Pit Boss' stack.  He has about $100 left.  I decide to shove.  Pit Boss thinks a bit, and then says, "you're good" as he flips TT over onto the table in front of him.  I flip KK (short stack doesn't show).  The flop comes out A-high and the board then runs dry.  Apparently, short stack doesn't have an Ace, and gets up and leaves.  Now, here's where things get a bit interesting.  Dealer pushes the pot to me -- $130.  I look at the rest of Pit Boss' chips and say, "I was all in."  Dealer says, "he folded."   Ok.  My bad.  Now, granted, at this point in the evening, I was feeling pretty good.  My recollection of events is a little fuzzy.  In fact, I can't recall if the dealer mucked the pocket tens or whether they remained on the table.  I didn't notice.  Again, in my head, I really though he had called my shove.  After a few minutes of reflection, I was left wondering whether Pitt Boss ran an angle here with the "your good," followed by tabling TT face up (which, I do seem to recall, was close in front of him and no where near the muck).  The fact that he appeared to be a gambler, combined with the fact that he had only $100 give or take $10 or 20 left, and that the pot was $198, also made me question his intentions.  Again, maybe it was just my semi-drunken perception of the matter.  But it seemed a bit strange.  I'm curious if grrouchie recalls the hand and has any thoughts . . .

At this point in the evening, the quality of my record keeping (which, generally, has a negative correlation to the number of adult beverages consumed) deteriorated rapidly.  Ok.  It ceased to exist.  I have no further notes on any subsequent hands.  I did, however, manage to take a series of pictures of my growing chip stack and its numerous configurations and re-configurations, including this beauty:



ggrrouchie called it a night around 11:30 or so.  I quit sometime thereafter, and booked a $330 profit for the session -- a total profit of $550 for the day.  Solidly in the black (for cash games) for the vacation.  Success.

- PPP

    



   

    

25 comments:

  1. To be honest, with you feeding me drinks and forcing me to drink a Mimosa or whatever it's called - I was getting fuzzy at that point and shortly thereafter had to switch to red-bulls to wake up enough to drive home that night.

    I do know that at Bally's when someone goes all in they get an All-in Button no matter what.
    When someone calls - they get a call button no matter what.....
    They never did give him a call button but you did get the all-in button...
    I know he flipped his cards up but never motioned with his chips....

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  2. All that and I am left with one question: Miller Lite?

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    1. Believe me, it pains me too. But it's 3.5 carbs per bottle, and it's better than drinking nothing (or drinking what I really want to drink and losing a leg because of it . . .)

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  3. When you flopped a set of 7s and tight old man coffee bets the K turn...he has AK or KQ....and you have him crushed...get more value...on the turn and river...it pained me to even read that.

    On the KK vs TT hand...if they give out buttons...then it was probably legit. In the future I would suggest clarifying the action before the dealer continues...ask the guy "Is that a call or a fold?"...I mean you want his money in there when you are a 4-1 favorite.

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  4. had fun playing and talking with you and grrouchie. i (spitball) was sitting one seat to your left at ballys. i remember the TT vs KK hand. he folded.

    hopefully catch up with you in early september, my next scheduled visit.

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  5. Well done Mr Peters, booking a solid win on the last day to get in the black was an excellent way to finish out the week.

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  6. Good turnaround! I've seen that move before with the KK vs TT hand; I have learned to not act until the villain declares his intention more clear (I've been burned by this). "You're good," is not a statement of intention.

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    1. Yeah; that's what mad me think about it. As grrouchie mentioned, if I had an all in card and he didn't have a call card, it is what it is. The blame is on me, perhaps, for flipping too quickly (without making him clarify). If I had flipped 99 or A J, perhaps his "your good" takes on different meaning . . .

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  7. Think you need to work on getting more value out of your flopped sets and other value hands.

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    1. How would you have played the 77 and 55 hands differently? [serious question]. Thanks in advance.

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  8. The 55 hand - probably a bit too much of a raise. Def agree with a raise here though. The 77 hand, come on! Are you afraid of precisely one hand? You are crushing all of his range - particularly if he's a tight guy. Unless he turned KKK, you're good. Hit him on the turn. Charge the river.

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    1. Totally agree on the 77 hand. While it was being played out, I was "scared of the straight." After the hand played out, and I thought about it, it was an unwarranted fear, because he is rarely going to have the 8. I should have at least tried to get more value out of that hand.

      Of course, assuming he had a hand like AJ (and hadn't hit the King), I might have won even less had I lead the turn . . .

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    2. I like leading the 55 hand personally...there is ~$50 in the pot and a ton of bad cards. I really dislike c/r this hand. It is such a strong line. Think about it this way: If you lead this flop your range is soooo much wider than a c/r. when you c/r you generally have 55, KJ or perhaps QTcc or AQcc..a strong made or massive drawing hand. When you lead we can have KQ, KT, etc. etc. etc. Also, what hands are going to continue with you when you c/r...KK, JJ, KJ, QTcc, AQcc...only one of those hands is buried against us. If we lead a lot of hands with poor equity are coming along to at least see 1 more card.

      The 77 hand is a mess (sorry). You flopped a set and never once bet in a HU pot??? Huh? I am ok with checking the flop in a HU pot (if this was 3 ways+ I lead every time). But if we are checking WE HAVE to lead turn. K hits his range a decent amount. As played, just min-c/r the river. Just take some initiative somewhere in the hand. Unless he has 88 you are good. Is he really checking flop with 88? You won the absolute min here IMO.

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    3. Thanks Brian. Appreciate the perspective, particularly the rationale of leading out on the 55 hand. Makes a lot of sense. I think in retrospect I played both "not to somehow lose" instead of trying to win the max

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  9. I play 2/5 and 5/10 as well as up to 5/10 PLO. The BIGGEST error I see in low stakes players is an unwillingness to get value out of their big hands. Try something for me in your next session:

    -Play no hands "trappy"; we can rarely get stacks in unless we bet, bet, bet

    -Bet bigger than you think with premiums. Got 4 limpers pre flop and you wake up with AA? Make it 20 or 25; there is a raise to 10 and 2 calls in front and you wake up with KK-make it 60 to go...you will be shocked by how much higher your win rate is.

    -Bet turns and rivers with thinner and thinner equity. If you don't get called on the river once or twice a session by a better hand, you aren't bluffing nearly enough or value betting thin enough.

    Anyway I could go on and on. I am in Baltimore and PM knows me. Follow my blog birdies-badbeats.blogspot.com or my 2p2 PGC thread http://forumserver.twoplustwo.com/174/poker-goals-challenges/withered-live-grinder-moving-up-wsop-ing-1339003/ I outline a lot of my thought processes in both.

    Good luck...there is a lot more low hanging fruit out there just have to grab it!!

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    1. Thanks again, Brian. One of the reasons I do this blog (in addition to entertainment and documenting some fun times) is the help learn the game from better players. Comments like yours (and PM's and others) are awesome and always appreciated.

      By the way, not sure what your perception of my hands was, but I was actually NOT trying to be "trappy." It was just the opposite. It was fear. It was fear of building a big pot and (a) either finding out that I was behind, or (b) getting sucked out on, or, worst of all, (c) getting hit on the river with a huge bet/raise, etc. and playing for stacks with less than the nuts. In short, wasn't being trying (particularly with my line on the 77 hand). It was an effort at "pot control."

      I know this is probably my biggest weakness in general. At least in my cash game. In certain respects, I think I've become a better MTT player because I'm less worried, and more aggressive in my play.

      Definitely something to work on.

      P.S. Adding you to the blog roll now.

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    2. Sure learning from writing your thoughts and getting comments from others is a great way to develop. Feel free to post any questions on mine or in here. i am glad to answer. I actually coach 6 guys and find that articulating my thoughts helps me think about concepts, etc.

      Perhaps we will meet when the shitshow begins at MD Live!

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    3. No doubt - counting down the days!

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    4. Fellas... I want to join in on this meet up. From my understanding, the poker room won't be open for a few months, but they'll have "normal" things there like comps, actually welcoming of the players (not greeting them with scorn), promotions, etc.

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    5. Seems like they are doing everything that C-Town failed to do. Mike Smith is making a great first impression through the 2+2 forum. I just hope there are not hour-plus waits to find a seat once it opens.

      Of course, I still think that my loyalty will revert back to Ceasars once the Horseshoe opens in late 2014. Horseshoe will only be another 10 minutes from the D.C. area. And it's right off 95, easy to get to. And I like building comps with a national brand.

      That being said, I'll have at least a full year at MDL! And, who knows . . . maybe the room will just blow me away.

      I'm just looking forward to hitting up MDL! on the weekends, and spending entire days playing cards and watching football!

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  10. Congrats on a great comeback. Sorry we didn't get together more. the only time we played at the same table, it was the start of my horrific runbad, tho that took place after you left and thus you couldn't be responsible. :) No, as I explained in my blog post, it was all the fault of the husband of the woman in the orange dress with the big tits.

    I just barely learned about the 1842 pub place at MGM late in my visit, it is indeed new. I did check out the menu and it seemed rather pricey to me. I guess I should give it a try tho, based on your recommendation. My pal Prudence was there for the opening and wants to give it another go.

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    1. That place is by no means "cheap." I was actually sort of shocked my first visit. I had just gotten into town, went there (passed by it on the walk from Signature) and ordered two miller lites -- $18. And it did not get any cheaper!

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  11. crap... I failed to reason you were still in town on Saturday the 13th.. My wife and I had a free poker day and went to Mirage. We will have to meet up another time maybe? Dare, Atlantic City?

    Strat tip: Brian is right. lead out with sets on flops with a lot of players. It gets value and looks less threatening then the check raise. Often an overpair is going to raise you. You can then just call and either bet out on the turn (if board is wet) or check/raise (if board is dry). And don't worry about running into set over set. you're just going to lose your chips. Look for value when you hit sets.

    GG

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    1. Vook - congrats again on the ME run. Well done!

      Would love to meet up sometime. Will you be playing at MDLive at all?

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  12. another comment to tag onto Brian's

    In general approach the flop and turn with the idea that you should bet until they tell you your hand is no good. You don't have to have a monster. When your reverse implied odds are low with a made hand... If you are facing a turn with a heavy draw board, it is better to take a bet/fold to a raise line then to check or check/call a bet. THis way you get value when you are ahead and are often told when you are behind (which keeps you from check/calling a turn and river).

    hope that makes sense....

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